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2020-07-20

Special Care of Delphi 10.4

sillybug.jpg, Jul 2020

A regression in the Delphi 10.4 compiler was identified. Its optimizer wrongly deletes some code, in one very specific part of the framework.

sillybug.jpg, Jul 2020

As a result a GPF (Access violation) may be triggered with Delphi 10.4 in release mode - the debug mode (when optimization is disabled) has no problem. Thanks to great user feedback, we were able to circumvent it. But we should better stay in alert, like any mORMot, until Delphi 10.4 officially release a patch.

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2020-03-03

Preparing Revision 2.x of the mORMot Framework

The more I think of it, the more I am convinced it is time to change how the framework is versioned.
We have version 1.18 since years... difficult to follow... time to upgrade!


I would like to upgrade mORMot to version 2 - with a major refactoring.

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2018-11-12

EKON 22 Slides and Code

I've uploaded two sets of slides from my presentations at EKON 22 : Object Pascal Clean Code Guidelines Proposal High Performance Object Pascal Code on Servers with the associated source code The WorkShop about "Getting REST with mORMot" has a corresponding new Samples folder in our  […]

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2018-02-07

Status of mORMot ORM SOA MVC with FPC

In the last weeks/months, we worked a lot with FPC.
Delphi is still our main IDE, due to its better debugging experience under Windows, but we target to have premium support of FPC, on all platforms, especially Linux.

The new Delphi Linux compiler is out of scope, since it is heavily priced, its performance is not so good, and ARC broke memory management so would need a deep review/rewrite of our source code, which we can't afford - since we have FPC which is, from our opinion,  a much better compiler for Linux.
Of course, you can create clients for Delphi Linux and FMX, as usual, using the cross-platform client parts of mORMot. But for server side, this compiler is not supported, and will probably never be.

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2016-04-09

AES-256 based Cryptographically Secure Pseudo-Random Number Generator (CSPRNG)

Everyone knows about the pascal random() function.
It returns some numbers, using a linear congruential generator, with a multiplier of 134775813, in its Delphi implementation.
It is fast, but not really secure. Output is very predictable, especially if you forgot to execute the RandSeed() procedure.

In real world scenarios, safety always requires random numbers, e.g. for key/nonce/IV/salt/challenge generation.
The less predictable, the better.
We just included a Cryptographically Secure Pseudo-Random Number Generator (CSPRNG) into our SynCrypto.pas unit.
The TAESPRNG class would use real system entropy to generate a sequence of pseudorandom bytes, using AES-256, so returning highly unpredictable content.

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2015-07-14

New blog about mORMot

An enthusiastic mORMot user, named willo in the forum, just started a blog about his experiments with our framework.

The information there is clear, simple, and right to the point.
If you are a little lost in our huge documentation, it is a good place to start!

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2015-06-30

Faster String process using SSE 4.2 Text Processing Instructions STTNI

A lot of our code, and probably yours, is highly relying on text process. In our mORMot framework, most of its features use JSON text, encoded as UTF-8. Profiling shows that a lot of time is spent computing the end of a text buffer, or comparing text content. You may know that In its SSE4.2 feature  […]

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2015-05-18

CQRS Persistence Service of any DDD object with mORMot

We introduced DDD concepts some time ago, in a series of articles in this blog. At that time, we proposed a simple way of using mORMot types to implement DDD in your applications. But all Domain Entitities being tied to the framework TSQLRecord class did appear as a limitation, breaking the  […]

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2015-04-06

Asynchronous Service - WebSockets, Callbacks and Publish-Subscribe

When publishing SOA services, most of them are defined as stateless, in a typical query/answer pattern - see Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA).
This fits exactly with the RESTful approach of Client-Server services via interfaces, as proposed by the framework.

But it may happen that a client application (or service) needs to know the state of a given service. In a pure stateless implementation, it will have to query the server for any state change, i.e. for any pending notification - this is called polling.

Polling may take place for instance:

  • When a time consuming work is to be processed on the server side. In this case, the client could not wait for it to be finished, without raising a timeout on the HTTP connection: as a workaround, the client may start the work, then ask for its progress status regularly using a timer and a dedicated method call;
  • When an unpredictable event is to be notified from the server side. In this case, the client should ask regularly (using a timer, e.g. every second), for any pending event, then react on purpose.

It may therefore sounds preferred, and in some case necessary, to have the ability to let the server notify one or several clients without any prior query, nor having the requirement of a client-side timer:

  • Polling may be pretty resource consuming on both client and server sides, and add some unwanted latency;
  • If immediate notification is needed, some kind of "long polling" algorithm may take place, i.e. the server will wait for a long time before returning the notification state if no event did happen: in this case, a dedicated connection is required, in addition to the REST one;
  • In an event-driven systems, a lot of messages are sent to the clients: a proper publish/subscribe mechanism is preferred, otherwise the complexity of polling methods may increase and become inefficient and unmaintainable;
  • Explicit push notifications may be necessary, e.g. when a lot of potential events, associated with a complex set of parameters, are likely to be sent by the client.

Our mORMot framework is therefore able to easily implement asynchronous callbacks over WebSockets, defining the callbacks as interface parameters in service method definitions - see Available types for methods parameters.

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Real-Time ORM Master/Slave Replication via WebSockets

In a previous article, we presented how Master/Slave replication may be easily implemented in mORMot's RESTful ORM.
Do not forget to visit the corresponding paragraphs of our online documentation, which has been updated, and is more accurate!

Sometimes, the on-demand synchronization is not enough.
So we have just introduced real-time replication via WebSockets.
For instance, you may need to:

  • Synchronize a short list of always evolving items which should be reflected as soon as possible;
  • Involve some kind of ACID-like behavior (e.g. handle money!) in your replicated data;
  • Replicate not from a GUI application, but from a service, so use of a TTimer is not an option;
  • Combine REST requests (for ORM or services) and master/slave ORM replication on the same wire, e.g. in a multi-threaded application.

In this case, the framework is able to use WebSockets and asynchronous callbacks to let the master/slave replication - see Asynchronous callbacks - take place without the need to ask explicitly for pending data.
You would need to use TSQLRestServer.RecordVersionSynchronizeMasterStart, TSQLRestServer.RecordVersionSynchronizeSlaveStart and TSQLRestServer.RecordVersionSynchronizeSlaveStop methods over the proper kind of bidirectional connection.

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2015-03-31

ORM Master/Slave Replication

Master Slave ORM Replication

As stated during TSQLRecord fields definition, the ORM is able to maintain a revision number for any TSQLRecord table, so that it the table may be easily synchronized remotely by another TSQLRestServer instance.
If you define a TRecordVersion published property, the ORM core will fill this field just before any write with a monotonically increasing revision number, and will take care of any deletion, so that those modifications may be replayed later on any other database.

This synchronization will work as a strict master/slave replication scheme, as a one-way on demand refresh of a replicated table.
Each write operation on the master database on a given table may be easily reflected on one or several slave databases, with almost no speed nor storage size penalty.

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2015-03-30

GitHub temporary unavailable from comand line?

Perhaps it is due to a lot of projects moving from closing Google Code to GitHub, but I experimented some GitHub random communication errors since last week.

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2015-03-17

Framework Documentation Enhanced By Links

The mORMot framework documentation, in its HTML online form, has been enhanced to include links to almost of the code symbols. In fact, the latest version of our SynProject tool will search for code symbols (types, methods, constants, functions):  Everywhere in the API Reference pages; In the text  […]

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2015-02-21

SynCrypto: SSE4 x64 optimized asm for SHA-256

We have just included some optimized x64 assembler to our Open Source SynCrypto.pas unit so that SHA-256 hashing will perform at best speed.
It is an adaptation from tuned Intel's assembly macros, which makes use of the SSE4 instruction set, if available.

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2015-01-15

AES-NI enabled for SynCrypto

Today, we committed a new patch to enable AES-NI hardware acceleration to our SynCrypto.pas unit. Intel® AES-NI is a new encryption instruction set that improves on the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm and accelerates the encryption of data on newer processors. Of course, all this is  […]

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2015-01-10

mORMot under Linux thanks to FPC

You can use the FreePascal Compiler (FPC) to compile the mORMot framework source code, targetting Windows and Linux.

Linux is a premium target for cheap and efficient server Hosting. Since mORMot has no dependency, installing a new mORMot server is as easy as copying its executable on a blank Linux host, then run it. No need to install any framework nor runtime. You could even use diverse operating systems (several Linux or Windows Server versions) in your mORMot servers farm, with minimal system requirements, and updates.

We will now see how to write your software with Linux-compiling in mind, and also give some notes about how to install a Linux Virtual Machine with Lazarus on your Windows computer, compiling both FPC and Lazarus from their SVN latest sources!

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2014-11-23

Breaking change: New SynLog and SynTests unit extracted from SynCommons.pas

In order to enhance code modularity, we extracted logging and testing features from SynCommons.pas. Discover the new SynLog.pas and SynTests.pas units! Documentation has been updated to reflect the changes. This is a breaking change... Ensure you add SynLog and/or SynTests to your uses clauses, just  […]

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2014-11-20

BeDelphi 2014 Slides

We just finished our Be-Delphi 2014 sessions and drank our last beers, so here we are.

I published some slides for this great event.

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2014-11-14

BREAKING CHANGE - TSQLRecord.ID primary key changed to TID: Int64

Up to now, the TSQLRecord.ID property was defined in mORMot.pas as a plain PtrInt/NativeInt (i.e. Integer under Win32), since it was type-cast as pointer for TSQLRecord published properties.
We introduced a new TID type, so that the ORM primary key would now be defined as Int64.

All the framework ORM process relies on the TSQLRecord class.
This abstract TSQLRecord class features a lot of built-in methods, convenient to do most of the ORM process in a generic way, at record level.

It first defines a primary key field, defined as ID: TID, i.e. as Int64 in mORMot.pas:

type
  TID = type Int64;
  ...
  TSQLRecord = class(TObject)
  ...
    property ID: TID read GetID write fID;
  ...

In fact, our ORM relies now on a Int64 primary key, matching the SQLite3 ID/RowID primary key.
This primary key will be used as RESTful resource identifier, for all CRUD operations.

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Automatic TSQLRecord memory handling

Working with objects is pretty powerful, but requires to handle manually the created instances life time, via try .. finally blocks. Most of the time, the TSQLRecord life time would be very short: we allocate one instance on a local variable, then release it when it goes out of scope.

If we take again the TSQLBaby sample, we may write:

function NewMaleBaby(Client: TSQLRest; const Name,Address: RawUTF8): TID;
var Baby: TSQLBaby;   // store a record
begin
  Baby := TSQLBaby.Create;
  try
    Baby.Name := Name;
    Baby.Address := Address;
    Baby.BirthDate := Date;
    Baby.Sex := sMale;
    result := Client.Add(Baby);
  finally
    Baby.Free;
  end;
end;

To ease this pretty usual pattern, the framework offers some kind of automatic memory management at TSQLRecord level:

function NewMaleBaby(Client: TSQLRest; const Name,Address: RawUTF8): TID;
var Baby: TSQLBaby;   // store a record
begin
  TSQLBaby.AutoFree(Baby);  // no try..finally needed!
  Baby.Name := Name;
  Baby.Address := Address;
  Baby.BirthDate := Date;
  Baby.Sex := sMale;
  result := Client.Add(Baby);
end; // local Baby instance will be released here

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