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2015, Tuesday March 31

ORM Master/Slave Replication

As stated during TSQLRecord fields definition, the ORM is able to maintain a revision number for any TSQLRecord table, so that it the table may be easily synchronized remotely by another TSQLRestServer instance.
If you define a TRecordVersion published property, the ORM core will fill this field just before any write with a monotonically increasing revision number, and will take care of any deletion, so that those modifications may be replayed later on any other database.

This synchronization will work as a strict master/slave replication scheme, as a one-way on demand refresh of a replicated table.
Each write operation on the master database on a given table may be easily reflected on one or several slave databases, with almost no speed nor storage size penalty.

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2014, Wednesday December 31

2015: the future of mORMot is BigData

How would be 2015 like for our little rodents?
Due to popular request of several users of mORMot, we identified and designed some feature requests dedicated to BigData process.

In fact, your data is the new value, especially if you propose SaaS (Software As A Service) hosting to your customers, with a farm of mORMot servers.
Recent Linux support for mORMot servers, together with the high performance and installation ease of our executable, open the gate to cheap cloud-based hosting.
As a consequence, a lot of information would certainly be gathered by your mORMot servers, and a single monolithic database is not an option any more.

For mORMot solutions hosted in cloud, a lot of data may be generated. The default SQLite3 storage engine may be less convenient, once it reaches some GB of file content. Backup becomes to be slow and inefficient, and hosting this oldest data in the main DB, probably stored on an expensive SSD, may be a lost of resource. Vertical scaling is limited by hardware and price factors.

This is were data sharding comes into scene.
Note that sharding is not replication/backup, nor clustering, nor just spreading. We are speaking about application-level data splitting, to ease maintenance and horizontal scalability of mORMot servers.

Data sharding could already be implemented with mORMot servers, thanks to TSQLRestStorage:

  • Using TSQLRestStorageExternal: any table may have its own external SQL database engine, may be in its separated DB server;
  • Using TSQLRestStorageMongoDB: any table may be stored on a MongoDB cluster, with its own sharding abilities;
  • Using TSQLRestStorageRemote: each table may have its own remote ORM/REST server.

But when data stored in a single table tends to grow without limit, this feature is not enough.
Let's see how the close future of mORMot looks like.

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2014, Friday August 15

Background Backup of a SQLite3 Database

The primary purpose of any software Backup is to recover data after its loss, be it by data deletion or corruption.
Data loss can be a common experience of computer users. A 2008 survey found that 66% of respondents had lost files on their home PC, as Wikipedia quotes.

As a consequence, for any professional use of data, like in our mORMot server, a backup policy is mandatory.

We just introduced officially the SQLite3 Backup API to our low-level SynSQLite3.pas unit, and wrote dedicated methods to make background backup of a running mORMot server easy and safe, without any noticeable performance penalty.

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