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2015, Monday February 16

Benchmarking JsonDataObjects JSON parser

There is a new player in town.
Since it has been written by Andreas Hausladen, the maintainer of the great Delphi IDE fix packs, this new JSON library is very promising.

And in fact, it is fast, and sounds pretty great!
Here are some numbers, compared with SuperObject, standard DBXJson, dwsJSON, QDAC and mORMot.
Please refer to previous benchmark articles about those libraries. We will now focus on JsonDataObjects.

Continue reading...

2015, Sunday February 1

Benchmarking QDAC3 JSON parser

Do you know QDAC3 ?
This is an open source project, from China (with Chinese comments and exception errors messages, but the methods and variables are in English).
It is cross-platform, and told to be very fast about JSON process.

You can download this Open Source project code from http://sourceforge.net/projects/qdac3
And their blog - in Chinese - is at http://blog.qdac.cc/

So I included QDAC3 in our "25 - JSON performance" sample.
Numbers are talking, now.

Continue reading...

2014, Friday September 12

Faster WideString process for good old non Unicode Delphi 6-2007

For pre-Unicode versions of Delphi, the unique way of having UTF-16 native type is to use the WideString type.
This type, under Windows, matched the BSTR managed type, as used by OLE and COM components.

In Delphi, WideString implementation calls directly the corresponding Windows API, and do not use the main Delphi heap manager.
Even if since Vista, this API did have a huge speed-up, it is still in practice much slower than the regular string type. Problems is not about UTF-16 encoding, but about the memory allocation, which is shared among processes, using the Windows global heap, and is much slower than our beloved FastMM4.
Newer versions of Delphi (since Delphi 2009) feature a refactored string = UnicodeString type, which relies on FastMM4 and not the Windows API, and is much faster than WideString.

Within our mORMot framework, we by-passed this limitation by using our RawUTF8 type, which is UTF-8 encoded, so as Unicode ready as the new UnicodeString type, and pretty fast.
In a recent internal project, we had to use a lot of WideString instances, to support UTF-16 encoding in Delphi 7/2007, involving a lot of text.

It sounded to be very slow, so we had to do something!

This is where our new SynFastWideString unit comes in.

Purpose of this unit is to patch the system.pas unit for older versions of Delphi, so that WideString memory allocation would use FastMM4 instead of the slow BSTR Windows API.
It will speed up the WideString process a lot, especially when a lot of content is allocated, since FastMM4 is much more aggressive than Windows' global heap and the BSTR slow API. It could be more than 50 times faster, especially when releasing the used memory.
The WideString implementation pattern does NOT feature Copy-On-Write, so is still slower than the string UnicodeString type as implemented since Delphi 2009. This is the reason why this unit won't do anything on Unicode versions of the compiler, since the new string type is to be preferred there.

Continue reading...

2014, Wednesday May 7

MongoDB + mORMot benchmark

Here are some benchmark charts about MongoDB integration in mORMot's ORM.

MongoDB appears as a serious competitor to SQL databases, with the potential benefit of horizontal scaling and installation/administration ease - performance is very high, and its document-based storage fits perfectly with mORMot's advanced ORM features like Shared nothing architecture (or sharding).

Continue reading...

MongoDB + mORMot ORM = ODM

MongoDB (from "humongous") is a cross-platform document-oriented database system, and certainly the best known NoSQL database.
According to http://db-engines.com in April 2014, MongoDB is in 5th place of the most popular types of database management systems, and first place for NoSQL database management systems.
Our mORMot gives premium access to this database, featuring full NoSQL and Object-Document Mapping (ODM) abilities to the framework.

Integration is made at two levels:

  • Direct low-level access to the MongoDB server, in the SynMongoDB.pas unit;
  • Close integration with our ORM (which becomes defacto an ODM), in the mORMotMongoDB.pas unit.

MongoDB eschews the traditional table-based relational database structure in favor of JSON-like documents with dynamic schemas (MongoDB calls the format BSON), which matches perfectly mORMot's RESTful approach.

This second article will focus on integration of MongoDB with our ORM.

Continue reading...

Direct MongoDB database access

MongoDB (from "humongous") is a cross-platform document-oriented database system, and certainly the best known NoSQL database.
According to http://db-engines.com in April 2014, MongoDB is in 5th place of the most popular types of database management systems, and first place for NoSQL database management systems.
Our mORMot framework gives premium access to this database, featuring full NoSQL and Object-Document Mapping (ODM) abilities to the framework.

Integration is made at two levels:

  • Direct low-level access to the MongoDB server, in the SynMongoDB.pas unit;
  • Close integration with our ORM (which becomes defacto an ODM), in the mORMotMongoDB.pas unit.

MongoDB eschews the traditional table-based relational database structure in favor of JSON-like documents with dynamic schemas (MongoDB calls the format BSON), which matches perfectly mORMot's RESTful approach.

In this first article, we will detail direct low-level access to the MongoDB server, via the SynMongoDB.pas unit.

Continue reading...

2014, Friday April 18

Introducing mORMot's architecture and design principles

We have just released a set of slides introducing 

  • ORM, SOA, REST, JSON, MVC, MVVM, SOLID, Mocks/Stubs, Domain-Driven Design concepts with Delphi, 
  • and showing some sample code using our Open Source mORMot framework.

You can follow the public link on Google Drive!

This is a great opportunity to discovers some patterns you may not be familiar with, and find out how mORMot try to implement them.
This set of slides may be less intimidating than our huge documentation - do not be terrified by our Online Documentation!
The first set of pages (presenting architecture and design principles) is worth reading.

Feedback is welcome on our forum, as usual.

2014, Saturday March 29

Enhanced and fixed late-binding of variants for Delphi XE2 and up

For several units of our framework, we allow late-binding of data values, using a variant and direct named access to properties:
- In SynCommons, we defined our TDocVariant custom variant type, able to store any JSON/BSON document-based content;
- In SynBigTable, we use the TSynTableVariantType custom variant type, as defined in SynCommons;
- In SynDB, we defined a TSQLDBRowVariantType, ready to access any column of a RDBMS data result set row;
- In mORMot, we allow access to TSQLTableRowVariantType column values.

It's a very convenient way of accessing result rows values. Code is still very readable, and safe at the same time.

For instance, we can write:

var V: variant;
 ...
  TDocVariant.New(V); // or slightly slower V := TDocVariant.New;
  V.name := 'John';
  V.year := 1972;
  // now V contains {"name":"john","year":1982}

This is just another implementation of KISS design in our framework.

Since Delphi XE2, some modifications were introduced to the official DispInvoke() RTL implementation:

  1. A new varUStrArg kind of parameter has been defined, which will allow to transmit UnicodeString property values;
  2. All text property values would be transmitted as BSTR / WideString / varOleStr variants to the invoked variant type;
  3. All textual property names were normalized to be in UPPERCASE.

Those modifications are worth considering...
And we may have discovered two regressions: one about speed, and the other about an unexpected logic bug...

Continue reading...

2014, Friday March 7

Support of MySQL, DB2 and PostgreSQL

We just tested, benchmarked and validated Oracle MySQL, IBM DB2 and PostgreSQL support for our SynDB database classes and the mORMot's ORM core.
This article will also show all updated results, including our newly introduced multi-value INSERT statement generations, which speed up a lot BATCH insertion.

Stay tuned!

Purpose here is not to say that one library or database is better or faster than another, but publish a snapshot of mORMot persistence layer abilities, depending on each access library.

In this timing, we do not benchmark only the "pure" SQL/DB layer access (SynDB units), but the whole Client-Server ORM of our framework.

Process below includes all aspects of our ORM:

  • Access via high level CRUD methods (Add/Update/Delete/Retrieve, either per-object or in BATCH mode);
  • Read and write access of TSQLRecord instances, via optimized RTTI;
  • JSON marshaling of all values (ready to be transmitted over a network);
  • REST routing, with security, logging and statistic;
  • Virtual cross-database layer using its SQLite3 kernel;
  • SQL on-the-fly generation and translation (in virtual mode);
  • Access to the database engines via several libraries or providers.

In those tests, we just bypassed the communication layer, since TSQLRestClient and TSQLRestServer are run in-process, in the same thread - as a TSQLRestServerDB instance. So you have here some raw performance testimony of our framework's ORM and RESTful core, and may expect good scaling abilities when running on high-end hardware, over a network.

On a recent notebook computer (Core i7 and SSD drive), depending on the back-end database interfaced, mORMot excels in speed, as will show the following benchmark:

  • You can persist up to 570,000 objects per second, or retrieve 870,000 objects per second (for our pure Delphi in-memory engine);
  • When data is retrieved from server or client 38, you can read more than 900,000 objects per second, whatever the database back-end is;
  • With a high-performance database like Oracle, and our direct access classes, you can write 70,000 (via array binding) and read 160,000 objects per second, over a 100 MB network;
  • When using alternate database access libraries (e.g. Zeos, or DB.pas based classes), speed is lower (even if comparable for DB2, MS SQL, PostgreSQL, MySQL) but still enough for most work, due to some optimizations in the mORMot code (e.g. caching of prepared statements, SQL multi-values insertion, direct export to/from JSON, SQlite3 virtual mode design, avoid most temporary memory allocation...).

Difficult to find a faster ORM, I suspect.

Continue reading...

2013, Tuesday December 10

JSON record serialization

In Delphi, the record has some nice advantages:

  • record are value objects, i.e. accessed by value, not by reference - this can be very convenient, e.g. when defining a Domain-Driven Design
  • record can contain any other record or dynamic array, so are very convenient to work with (no need to define sub-classes or lists); 
  • record variables can be allocated on stack, so won't solicit the global heap; 
  • record instances automatically freed by the compiler when they come out of scope, so you won't need to write any try..finally Free; end block.

Serialization of record values are therefore a must-have for a framework like mORMot.

In recent commits, this JSON serialization of record has been enhanced.
In particular, we introduced JSON serialization via a new text-based record definition.

Continue reading...

2013, Monday November 4

Updated mORMot database benchmark - including MS SQL and PostgreSQL

On an recent notebook computer (Core i7 and SSD drive), depending on the back-end database interfaced, mORMot excels in speed:

  • You can persist up to 570,000 objects per second, or retrieve more than 900,000 objects per second (for our pure Delphi in-memory engine);
  • When data is retrieved from server or client cache, you can read more than 900,000 objects per second, whatever the database back-end is;
  • With a high-performance database like Oracle and our direct access classes, you can write 65,000 (via array binding) and read 160,000 objects per second, over a 100 MB network;
  • When using alternate database access libraries (e.g. Zeos, or DB.pas based classes), speed is lower, but still enough for most work.

Difficult to find a faster ORM, I suspect.

The following tables try to sum up all available possibilities, and give some benchmark (average objects/second for writing or read).

In these tables:

  • 'SQLite3 (file full/off/exc)' indicates use of the internal SQLite3 engine, with or without Synchronous := smOff and/or DB.LockingMode := lmExclusive;
  • 'SQLite3 (mem)' stands for the internal SQLite3 engine running in memory;
  • 'SQLite3 (ext ...)' is about access to a SQLite3 engine as external database - either as file or memory;
  • 'TObjectList' indicates a TSQLRestServerStaticInMemory instance, either static (with no SQL support) or virtual (i.e. SQL featured via SQLite3 virtual table mechanism) which may persist the data on disk as JSON or compressed binary;
  • 'Oracle' shows the results of our direct OCI access layer (SynDBOracle.pas);
  • 'NexusDB' is the free embedded edition, available from official site;
  • 'Zeos *' indicates that the database was accessed directly via the ZDBC layer;
  • 'FireDAC *' stands for FireDAC library;
  • 'UniDAC *' stands for UniDAC library;
  • 'BDE *' when using a BDE connection;
  • 'ODBC *' for a direct access to ODBC;
  • 'Jet' stands for a MSAccess database engine, accessed via OleDB;
  • 'MSSQL local' for a local connection to a MS SQL Express 2008 R2 running instance (this was the version installed with Visual Studio 2010), accessed via OleDB.

This list of database providers is to be extended in the future. Any feedback is welcome!

Numbers are expressed in rows/second (or objects/second). This benchmark was compiled with Delphi 7, so newer compilers may give even better results, with in-lining and advanced optimizations.

Note that these tests are not about the relative speed of each database engine, but reflect the current status of the integration of several DB libraries within the mORMot database access.

Purpose here is not to say that one library or database is better or faster than another, but publish a snapshot of current mORMot persistence layer abilities.

In this timing, we do not benchmark only the "pure" SQL/DB layer access (SynDB units), but the whole Client-Server ORM of our framework: process below includes read and write RTTI access of a TSQLRecord, JSON marshaling, CRUD/REST routing, virtual cross-database layer, SQL on-the-fly translation. We just bypass the communication layer, since TSQLRestClient and TSQLRestServer are run in-process, in the same thread - as a TSQLRestServerDB instance. So you have here some raw performance testimony of our framework's ORM and RESTful core.

You can compile the "15 - External DB performance" supplied sample code, and run the very same benchmark on your own configuration.

Continue reading...

2013, Thursday September 19

FreePascal Lazarus and Android Native Controls

We all know that the first Delphi for Android was just released...

I just found out an amazing alternative, using native Android controls, and FPC/Lazarus as compiler and IDE.

It creates small .apk file: only 180 KB, from my tests!

It makes use of direct LCL access of Android native controls, so it is a great sample.

Continue reading...

2013, Saturday May 11

Delphi XE4 NextGen compiler: using byte instead of ansichar?

When I first read the technical white paper covering all of the language changes in XE4 for mobile development (tied to the new ARM LLVM-based Delphi compiler), I have to confess I was pretty much confused.

Two great mORMot users just asked for XE4/iOS support of mORMot.

Win32/Win64 support for XE4 will be done as soon as we got a copy of it.
I suspect the code already works, since it was working as expected with XE3, and we rely on our own set of low-level functions for most internal work.

But iOS-targetting is more complex, due to the NextGen compiler, mainly.

Continue reading...

2013, Monday April 22

TDataSet... now I'm confused

You perhaps know that I'm not a big fan of the TDataSet / RAD DB approach for end-user applications.
They are easy to define, almost no code to write, and you are able to publish a working solution very fast.

But it is a nightmare to debug and maintain. I prefer the new DataBinding feature, or... of course... ORM!
In mORMot, we have some auto-generated screens, and in our roadmap, we forcast to use some auto-binding features, using a KISS by-convention MVC pattern.

For some users, we made a ORM / TDataSet conversion unit.
And we discovered that TDataSet has a weird, and very misleading definition of its AsString property, for Unicode versions of Delphi.

Continue reading...

2013, Thursday March 7

64 bit compatibility of mORMot units

I'm happy to announce that mORMot units are now compiling and working great in 64 bit mode, under Windows.
Need a Delphi XE2/XE3 compiler, of course!

ORM and services are now available in Win64, on both client and server sides.
Low-level x64 assembler stubs have been created, tested and optimized.
UI part is also available... that is grid display, reporting (with pdf export and display anti-aliasing), ribbon auto-generation, SynTaskDialog, i18n... the main SynFile demo just works great!

Overall impression is very positive, and speed is comparable to 32 bit version (only 10-15% slower).

Speed decrease seems to be mostly due to doubled pointer size, and some less optimized part of the official Delphi RTL.
But since mORMot core uses its own set of functions (e.g. for JSON serialization, RTTI support or interface calls or stubbing), we were able to release the whole 64 bit power of your hardware.

Delphi 64 bit compiler sounds stable and efficient. Even when working at low level, with assembler stubs.
Generated code sounds more optimized than the one emitted by FreePascalCompiler - and RTL is very close to 32 bit mode.
Overall, VCL conversion worked as easily than a simple re-build.
Embarcadero's people did a great job for VCL Win64 support, here!

Continue reading...

2012, Thursday December 20

How to make it fast?

On our forum, a clever question was posted about publishing some enhanced RTL functions for newer versions of Delphi - as we did for Delphi 7 and 2007.

I was looking for a faster IntToStr implementation and discovered SynCommons.pas.
(....)
That's really too bad, SynCommons.pas really does contain some seriously fast stuff, people would greatly benefit from it if it was made general-purpose.

In fact, it would not be enough to change the RTL function implementations.
IMHO, to write something scalable, you need to get rid of such functions.

Continue reading...

2012, Sunday October 28

SynDBOracle: Open Source native Oracle access

(this is an update of the article published in 2011/07)

For our mORMot framework, and in completion to our SynOleDB unit, we added a new Open Source unit, named SynDBOracle. It allows direct access to any remote Oracle server, using the Oracle Call Interface.

Oracle Call Interface (OCI) is the most comprehensive, high performance, native unmanaged interface to the Oracle Database that exposes the full power of the Oracle Database. We wrote a direct call of the oci.dll library, using our DB abstraction classes introduced for SynOleDB.

We tried to implement all best-practice patterns detailed in the official Building High Performance Drivers for Oracle document

Resulting speed is quite impressive: for all requests, SynDBOracle is 3 to 5 times faster than a SynOleDB connection using the native OleDB Provider supplied by Oracle. We noted also that our implementation is 10 times faster than the one provided with ZEOS/ZDBC, which is far from optimized.

You can use the latest version of the Oracle Instant Client provided by Oracle - see this link - which allows you to run your applications without installing the standard (huge) Oracle client or having an ORACLE_HOME. Just deliver the dll files in the same directory than your application, and it will work.

Continue reading...

2012, Sunday September 9

Synopse mORMot framework 1.17

Our Open Source mORMot framework is now available in revision 1.17.

The main new features are the following:

We have some very exciting features on the road-map for the next 1.18 release, like direct Event/CallBacks handling.
Stay tuned!

Continue reading...

2012, Tuesday July 10

Better Unicode support in Reports and PDF generation

By default, both GDI+ anti-aliased drawing and PDF file generation using our libraries did lack of font-fallback implementation.

If some of the characters in a string are not supported in a requested font, they were drawn as square symbols on the GDI+ canvas or the PDF content.

The font-fallback mechanism implemented will use a third-party font (Arial Unicode MS by default, which is installed with Microsoft Office), for any glyph that are missing when rendering the content. Of course, for PDF generation, you are able to embed the font within the generated file (this is by the way mandatory for PDF/A-1 format).

Both of these new features are handled by the SQlite3Pages unit, i.e. for report anti-aliased drawing preview and PDF generation.

By the way, the TGDIPages class itself (the one used for report generation from code) now handles by default Unicode text, even with Delphi versions prior to 2009 (via the SynUnicode string type, which maps WideString before Delphi 2009, then UnicodeString starting with Delphi 2009). Does make sense with such a font-fallback mechanism.

Continue reading...

2012, Thursday April 12

Custom JSON serialization of any dynamic array content

One nice feature of the TDynArray wrapper and its associated methods, as defined and used in our framework, is the ability to serialize any dynamic array as JSON content.

By default, only "standard" dynamic arrays (like TIntegerDynArray) are serialized as true JSON array: other not known kind of arrays are serialized as binary content, within a Base64 encoding.

This is a very efficient solution for a pure Delphi application, since it will be fast and always works, but won't be easy to deal with from an AJAX client.

Applications can now supply a custom JSON serialization for any other dynamic array, via the TTextWriter.RegisterCustomJSONSerializer() class method.
Two callbacks are to be supplied for a dynamic array type information, in order to handle proper serialization and un-serialization of the JSON array.

Continue reading...

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