Synopse

To content | To menu | To search

Tag - Parsing

Entries feed

2014, Tuesday February 25

TDocVariant custom variant type

With revision 1.18 of the framework, we just introduced two new custom types of variants:

  • TDocVariant kind of variant;
  • TBSONVariant kind of variant.

The second custom type (which handles MongoDB-specific extensions - like ObjectID or other specific types like dates or binary) will be presented later, when dealing with MongoDB support in mORMot, together with the BSON kind of content. BSON / MongoDB support is implemented in the SynMongoDB.pas unit.

We will now focus on TDocVariant itself, which is a generic container of JSON-like objects or arrays.
This custom variant type is implemented in SynCommons.pas unit, so is ready to be used everywhere in your code, even without any link to the mORMot ORM kernel, or MongoDB.

TDocVariant documents

TDocVariant implements a custom variant type which can be used to store any JSON/BSON document-based content, i.e. either:

  • Name/value pairs, for object-oriented documents;
  • An array of values (including nested documents), for array-oriented documents;
  • Any combination of the two, by nesting TDocVariant instances.

Here are the main features of this custom variant type:

  • DOM approach of any object or array documents;
  • Perfect storage for dynamic value-objects content, with a schema-less approach (as you may be used to in scripting languages like Python or JavaScript);
  • Allow nested documents, with no depth limitation but the available memory;
  • Assignment can be either per-value (default, safest but slower when containing a lot of nested data), or per-reference (immediate reference-counted assignment);
  • Very fast JSON serialization / un-serialization with support of MongoDB-like extended syntax;
  • Access to properties in code, via late-binding (including almost no speed penalty due to our VCL hack as already detailed);
  • Direct access to the internal variant names and values arrays from code, by trans-typing into a TDocVariantData record;
  • Instance life-time is managed by the compiler (like any other variant type), without the need to use interfaces or explicit try..finally blocks;
  • Optimized to use as little memory and CPU resource as possible (in contrast to most other libraries, it does not allocate one class instance per node, but rely on pre-allocated arrays);
  • Opened to extension of any content storage - for instance, it will perfectly integrate with BSON serialization and custom MongoDB types (ObjectID, RegEx...), to be used in conjunction with MongoDB servers;
  • Perfectly integrated with our Dynamic array wrapper and its JSON serialization as with the record serialization;
  • Designed to work with our mORMot ORM: any TSQLRecord instance containing such variant custom types as published properties will be recognized by the ORM core, and work as expected with any database back-end (storing the content as JSON in a TEXT column);
  • Designed to work with our mORMot SOA: any interface-based service is able to consume or publish such kind of content, as variant kind of parameters;
  • Fully integrated with the Delphi IDE: any variant instance will be displayed as JSON in the IDE debugger, making it very convenient to work with.

To create instances of such variant, you can use some easy-to-remember functions:

  • _Obj() _ObjFast() global functions to create a variant object document;
  • _Arr() _ArrFast() global functions to create a variant array document;
  • _Json() _JsonFast() _JsonFmt() _JsonFastFmt() global functions to create any variant object or array document from JSON, supplied either with standard or MongoDB-extended syntax.

Continue reading...

2013, Saturday May 11

Delphi XE4 NextGen compiler: using byte instead of ansichar?

When I first read the technical white paper covering all of the language changes in XE4 for mobile development (tied to the new ARM LLVM-based Delphi compiler), I have to confess I was pretty much confused.

Two great mORMot users just asked for XE4/iOS support of mORMot.

Win32/Win64 support for XE4 will be done as soon as we got a copy of it.
I suspect the code already works, since it was working as expected with XE3, and we rely on our own set of low-level functions for most internal work.

But iOS-targetting is more complex, due to the NextGen compiler, mainly.

Continue reading...

2013, Thursday March 7

64 bit compatibility of mORMot units

I'm happy to announce that mORMot units are now compiling and working great in 64 bit mode, under Windows.
Need a Delphi XE2/XE3 compiler, of course!

ORM and services are now available in Win64, on both client and server sides.
Low-level x64 assembler stubs have been created, tested and optimized.
UI part is also available... that is grid display, reporting (with pdf export and display anti-aliasing), ribbon auto-generation, SynTaskDialog, i18n... the main SynFile demo just works great!

Overall impression is very positive, and speed is comparable to 32 bit version (only 10-15% slower).

Speed decrease seems to be mostly due to doubled pointer size, and some less optimized part of the official Delphi RTL.
But since mORMot core uses its own set of functions (e.g. for JSON serialization, RTTI support or interface calls or stubbing), we were able to release the whole 64 bit power of your hardware.

Delphi 64 bit compiler sounds stable and efficient. Even when working at low level, with assembler stubs.
Generated code sounds more optimized than the one emitted by FreePascalCompiler - and RTL is very close to 32 bit mode.
Overall, VCL conversion worked as easily than a simple re-build.
Embarcadero's people did a great job for VCL Win64 support, here!

Continue reading...

2013, Sunday February 17

Interface-based service sample: remote SQL access

You will find in the SQLite3\Sample\16 - Execute SQL via services folder of mORMot source code a Client-Server sample able to access any external database via JSON and HTTP.
It is a good demonstration of how to use an interface-based service between a client and a server.
It will also show how our SynDB classes have a quite abstract design, and are easy to work with, whatever database provider you need to use.

The corresponding service contract has been defined:

  TRemoteSQLEngine = (rseOleDB, rseODBC, rseOracle, rseSQlite3, rseJet, rseMSSQL);

IRemoteSQL = interface(IInvokable) ['{9A60C8ED-CEB2-4E09-87D4-4A16F496E5FE}'] procedure Connect(aEngine: TRemoteSQLEngine; const aServerName, aDatabaseName, aUserID, aPassWord: RawUTF8); function GetTableNames: TRawUTF8DynArray; function Execute(const aSQL: RawUTF8; aExpectResults, aExpanded: Boolean): RawJSON; end;

Purpose of this service is:
- To Connect() to external databases, given the parameters of a standard TSQLDBConnectionProperties. Create() constructor;
- Retrieve all table names of this external database as a list;
- Execute any SQL statement, returning the content as JSON array, ready to be consumed by AJAX applications (if aExpanded is true), or a Delphi client (e.g. via a TSQLTableJSON and the mORMotUI unit).

Of course, this service will be define as sicClientDriven mode, that is, the framework will be able to manage a client-driven TSQLDBProperties instance life time.

Benefit of this service is that no database connection is required on the client side: a regular HTTP connection is enough.
No need to install nor configure any database provider, and full SQL access to the remote databases.

Due to our optimized JSON serialization, it will probably be faster to work with such plain HTTP / JSON services, instead of a database connection through a VPN. In fact, database connections are made to work on a local network, and do not like high-latency connections, which are typical on the Internet.

Continue reading...

2012, Thursday December 20

How to make it fast?

On our forum, a clever question was posted about publishing some enhanced RTL functions for newer versions of Delphi - as we did for Delphi 7 and 2007.

I was looking for a faster IntToStr implementation and discovered SynCommons.pas.
(....)
That's really too bad, SynCommons.pas really does contain some seriously fast stuff, people would greatly benefit from it if it was made general-purpose.

In fact, it would not be enough to change the RTL function implementations.
IMHO, to write something scalable, you need to get rid of such functions.

Continue reading...

2012, Thursday July 12

One ORM to rule them all

If you discovered the mORMot framework, you may have found out that its implementation may sound restricted, in comparison to other ORMs, due to its design. It would be easy to answer that "it is not a bug, it is a feature", but I suspect it is worth a dedicated article.

Some common (and founded) criticisms are the following (quoting from our forum - see e.g. this question):
- "One of the things I don't like so much about your approach to the ORM is the mis-use of existing Delphi constructs like "index n" attribute for the maximum length of a string-property. Other ORMs solve this i.e. with official Class-attributes";
- "You have to inherit from TSQLRecord, and can't persist any plain class";
- "There is no way to easily map an existing complex database".

I understand very well those concerns.
Our mORMot framework is not meant to fit any purpose, but it is worth understanding why it has been implemented as such, and why it may be quite unique within the family of ORMs - which almost all are following the Hibernate way of doing.

Continue reading...

2012, Thursday April 12

Custom JSON serialization of any dynamic array content

One nice feature of the TDynArray wrapper and its associated methods, as defined and used in our framework, is the ability to serialize any dynamic array as JSON content.

By default, only "standard" dynamic arrays (like TIntegerDynArray) are serialized as true JSON array: other not known kind of arrays are serialized as binary content, within a Base64 encoding.

This is a very efficient solution for a pure Delphi application, since it will be fast and always works, but won't be easy to deal with from an AJAX client.

Applications can now supply a custom JSON serialization for any other dynamic array, via the TTextWriter.RegisterCustomJSONSerializer() class method.
Two callbacks are to be supplied for a dynamic array type information, in order to handle proper serialization and un-serialization of the JSON array.

Continue reading...

2011, Tuesday December 6

Automatic JOIN query

In mORMot, all the methods available to handle many-to-many relationship (ManySelect, DestGetJoined...) are used to retrieve the relations between tables from the pivot table point of view. This saves bandwidth, and can be used in most simple cases, but it is not the only way to perform requests on many-to-many relationships. And you may have several TSQLRecordMany instances in the same main record - in this case, those methods won't help you.

It is very common, in the SQL world, to create a JOINed request at the main "Source" table level, and combine records from two or more tables in a database. It creates a set that can be saved as a table or used as is. A JOIN is a means for combining fields from two or more tables by using values common to each. Writing such JOINed statements is not so easy by hand, especially because you'll have to work with several tables, and have to specify the exact fields to be retrieved; if you have several pivot tables, it may start to be a nightmare.

Let's see how our ORM will handle it.

Continue reading...

2011, Thursday June 16

Which Delphi compiler produces faster code?

After a question on StackOverflow, I wanted to comment about the speed of generated code by diverse Delphi compiler versions.

Since performance matters when we write general purpose libraries like ours, we have some feedback to propose:

Continue reading...

2011, Thursday June 2

Fast JSON parsing

When it deals with parsing some (textual) content, two directions are usually envisaged. In the XML world, you have usually to make a choice between:
- A DOM parser, which creates an in-memory tree structure of objects mapping the XML nodes;
- A SAX parser, which reads the XML content, then call pre-defined events for each XML content element.

In fact, DOM parsers use internally a SAX parser to read the XML content. Therefore, with the overhead of object creation and their property initialization, DOM parsers are typically three to five times slower than SAX. But, DOM parsers are much more powerful for handling the data: as soon as it's mapped in native objects, code can access with no time to any given node, whereas a SAX-based access will have to read again the whole XML content.

Most JSON parser available in Delphi use a DOM-like approach. For instance, the DBXJSON unit included since Delphi 2010 or the SuperObject or DWS libraries create a class instance mapping each JSON node.

In a JSON-based Client-Server ORM like ours, profiling shows that a lot of time is spent in JSON parsing, on both Client and Server side. Therefore, we tried to optimize this part of the library.

Continue reading...