Synopse

To content | To menu | To search

Tag - MaxOSX

Entries feed

2015, Monday March 9

SynTaskDialog.pas version for Lazarus

Just to share a commit of some interest to FPC/Lazarus users.

Ondrej Pokorny (aka "reddwarf" in our forums) did send to us a nice implementation of our SynTaskDialog.pas unit, compatible with Lazarus.

Since it is incompatible with the current state of the other mORMot UI units (which are still VCL-based), we have included the source in the Third Party subfolder of our source code repository.
Direct link is https://github.com/.../SynTaskDialog4Lazarus

Resulting unit is cross-platform, as stated by the following screenshots:

Feedback is welcome on our forum, as usual.

2012, Saturday October 6

Delphi XE3 is preparing (weak) reference counting for class instances

In Delphi, you have several ways of handling data life time, therefore several ways of handling memory:

  • For simple value objects (e.g.  byte integer double shortstring and fixed size arrays or record containing only such types), the value is copied in fixed-size buffers;
  • For more complex value objets (e.g. string and dynamic arrays or record containing such types), there is a reference counter handled by each instance, with copy-on-write feature and compiler-generated reference counting at code scope level (with hidden try..finally blocks);
  • For most class instances (e.g. deriving from TObject), you have to Create then Free each instance, and manage its life time by hand - with explicit try..finally blocks;
  • For class deriving from TInterfacedObject, you have a RefCount property, with _AddRef _Release methods (this is the reference-counted COM model), and you can use Delphi interface to work with such instances - see this blog article.
With Delphi XE3, we were told that some automatic memory handling at class level are about to be introduced at the compiler and RTL level.
Even if this feature is not finished, and disabled, there are a lot of changes in the Delphi XE3 Run Time Library which sounds like a preparation of such a new feature.

Continue reading...

2011, Sunday September 25

Some thoughts about OSX integration in XE2

You know all that one of the most exciting features of Delphi XE2 is the MaxOSX Cross-Platform feature.
You've got the UI part, that is FireMonkey, but underneath, you did have some RTL modifications in order to let our Windows-centric solutions be OSX ready.

The first main step was to make our code speak with the "Objective-C" way of coding.

Objective-C is the primary language used for Apple's Cocoa API, and it was originally the main language on NeXT's NeXTSTEP OS. It's some object-oriented C variant, but something other than C++ or Java. In fact, Objective-C sounds more like a SmallTalk variance of C than another  C++/Java/C# flavor. For instance, the Objective-C model of object-oriented programming is based on message passing to object instances: this is just another way of doing it. It has some advantages, and disadvantages (I don't want to troll here) - but it is definitively nice. And the memory model is just something else, more close to our reference-counting way (as in Delphi interface implementation) than a garbage collector.

Continue reading...

2011, Monday August 8

Our mORMot won't hibernate this winter, thanks to FireMonkey

Everybody is buzzing about FireMonkey...

Our little mORMot will like FireMonkey!
Here is why...

Continue reading...

2010, Saturday August 14

FPC and Delphi: toward a "fratricidal war"?

Speaking about [upcoming] 64 bit Delphi compiler, I did forecast they will surely release their compiler 5 years later than FPC's... hoping they will follow the FPC way, just as Intel did about 64 bits instructions, against AMD.

What I was referring to is that AMD was the first to publish a 64 bit x86 CPU, with a new instruction set. Intel released somewhat later their own 64 bit x86 CPU, following the same instruction set.
There are some variants between AMD and Intel CPU, some dedicated instructions or implementations.
But most instruction set is perfectly compatible.

And I suspect the more it gets, the less compatible FPC and Delphi will be.

The main difference between Delphi and FPC is that the first is a business company project (Embarcadero), the second an Open Source solution. They are not two billions dollars companies fighting each other, with some state-level institutions watching about any unfair competition or monopoly... FPC compiler is technically a great and robust project, but EMB follows business rules. I don't think anyone will play "Anti-monopoly" in favor of FPC.

Continue reading...