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2014, Tuesday November 18

HTTP remote access for SynDB SQL execution

For mORMot, we developed a fully feature direct access layer to any RDBMS, implemented in the SynDB.pas unit.

You can use those SynDB classes to execute any SQL statement, without any link to the framework ORM.
At reading, the resulting performance is much higher than using the standard TDataSet component, which is in fact a true performance bottleneck.
It has genuine features, like column access via late-binding, an innovative ISQLDBRows interface, and ability to directly access the low-level binary buffers of the database clients.

We just added a nice feature to those classes: the ability to access remotely, via plain HTTP, to any SynDB supported database!

Continue reading...

2014, Friday September 12

Legacy code, mORMot, and database sharing

It is pretty much possible that you would have to maintain and evolve a legacy project, based on an existing database, with a lot of already written SQL statements - see Legacy code and existing projects.

For instance, you would like to use mORMot for new features, and/or add mobile or HTML clients - see Cross-Platform clients.
In this case, the ORM advanced features - like ORM Cache or BATCH process, see BATCH sequences for adding/updating/deleting records - may conflict with the legacy code, for the tables which may have to be shared.
Here are some guidelines when working on such a project.

To be exhaustive about your question, we need to consider each ORM CRUD operation.
We may have to divide them in three kinds: read queries, insertions, and modifications of existing data.

Continue reading...

2014, Friday March 7

Support of MySQL, DB2 and PostgreSQL

We just tested, benchmarked and validated Oracle MySQL, IBM DB2 and PostgreSQL support for our SynDB database classes and the mORMot's ORM core.
This article will also show all updated results, including our newly introduced multi-value INSERT statement generations, which speed up a lot BATCH insertion.

Stay tuned!

Purpose here is not to say that one library or database is better or faster than another, but publish a snapshot of mORMot persistence layer abilities, depending on each access library.

In this timing, we do not benchmark only the "pure" SQL/DB layer access (SynDB units), but the whole Client-Server ORM of our framework.

Process below includes all aspects of our ORM:

  • Access via high level CRUD methods (Add/Update/Delete/Retrieve, either per-object or in BATCH mode);
  • Read and write access of TSQLRecord instances, via optimized RTTI;
  • JSON marshaling of all values (ready to be transmitted over a network);
  • REST routing, with security, logging and statistic;
  • Virtual cross-database layer using its SQLite3 kernel;
  • SQL on-the-fly generation and translation (in virtual mode);
  • Access to the database engines via several libraries or providers.

In those tests, we just bypassed the communication layer, since TSQLRestClient and TSQLRestServer are run in-process, in the same thread - as a TSQLRestServerDB instance. So you have here some raw performance testimony of our framework's ORM and RESTful core, and may expect good scaling abilities when running on high-end hardware, over a network.

On a recent notebook computer (Core i7 and SSD drive), depending on the back-end database interfaced, mORMot excels in speed, as will show the following benchmark:

  • You can persist up to 570,000 objects per second, or retrieve 870,000 objects per second (for our pure Delphi in-memory engine);
  • When data is retrieved from server or client 38, you can read more than 900,000 objects per second, whatever the database back-end is;
  • With a high-performance database like Oracle, and our direct access classes, you can write 70,000 (via array binding) and read 160,000 objects per second, over a 100 MB network;
  • When using alternate database access libraries (e.g. Zeos, or DB.pas based classes), speed is lower (even if comparable for DB2, MS SQL, PostgreSQL, MySQL) but still enough for most work, due to some optimizations in the mORMot code (e.g. caching of prepared statements, SQL multi-values insertion, direct export to/from JSON, SQlite3 virtual mode design, avoid most temporary memory allocation...).

Difficult to find a faster ORM, I suspect.

Continue reading...